damn-small-linux

Getting Started With Damn Small Linux Users

 

This tutorial shows you some of the basics of Damn Small Linux users. You may want to read the article entitled Ten Important Linux Concepts For Beginners – Number 3, Users before you start clicking.

 


Step 1 Start Linux either from the Windows Desktop or from your USB pen drive and access the command line. Enter the following three commands, separated by the Enter key: whoami, sudo su, and whoami. The first whoami command shows that the dsl user is active, the sudo su command activates the root user, and the second whoami command shows that the rootuser is active. The results are shown in Figure 1.

linux_users_tutorial1_figure1

 

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 1
These commands switch and specify the active user.

Step 2 Enter the following three commands, separated by the Enter key: whoami, exit, and whoami. The first whoami command shows that the root user is active, the exit command reactivates the dsl user, and the final whoami command shows that the dsl user is active. The results are shown in Figure 2.

inux_users_tutorial1_figure2

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 2
These commands switch and specify the active user.

Step 3 It is easy to know what kind of user is presently active. A $ indicates an ordinary user such as dsl. A # indicates the root user. When the root user is active the system also displays in color the active directory, in this case /home/dsl. Now we will see the difference between users. Make sure that you are the dsl user and enter the command cp Events.cal /home which should copy a file into the home directory. This action is denied to regular users as shown in Figure 3.

inux_users_tutorial1_figure3

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 3
The dsl user may not copy into the home directory.


linux_users_tutorial1_figure4

Step 4 Reactivate the root user and enter the command cp Events.cal /home which should copy a file into the home directory. Note that pressing the up arrowdoes nothing instead of repeating the previous command. The up arrow does not work across users. The results are shown in Figure 4.
linux_users_tutorial1_figure4

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 4
The root user may copy into the home directory.

Step 5 We next want to determine if and where regular users may create directories. First we try to create a sister directory to the /home/dsl directory, the /home/dsl2 directory. The results are shown in Figure 5.

linux_users_tutorial1_figure5

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 5
The dsl user fails to create a directory starting from the /home directory.

Step 6 Next we try to create a daughter directory to the /home/dsl directory, the /home/dsl/dsl2 directory. The results are shown in Figure 6.
linux_users_tutorial1_figure6

Damn Small Linux Users Tutorial 1 Figure 6
The dsl user creates a directory starting from the /home/dsl directory.

 

LINUX-TUTORIAL

Linux 4 Windows Tutorials Mini Home Page

This page introduces our tutorials running on Damn Small Linux. If you can spare 50 Megabytes (not 50 Gigabytes, or for that matter 50 Kilobytes) you can run a great version of Linux with lots and lots of goodies on your Windows computer whether state of the art or not. You may even dust off a Windows 98 computer and use it to learn Linux instead of letting it rot in a landfill. The FAQ section answers many of your questions and sets some of our ground rules, such as not providing technical support. Next comes the clickable list of our tutorials, followed by a short description of each tutorial so that you can get a better idea of the tutorials before making your selection.

The first list comes without any explanation. The second list repeats the choices with a short explanation to help you make your selection.

 

More About Our Damn Small Linux Tutorials

The first tutorial shows you how to download Damn Small Linux. It’s legal and absolutely free. The Damn Small Linux people want you to use their product. And I really believe that you’ll also want to use it. Downloading Damn Small Linux

Once you have downloaded Damn Small Linux you will want to start creating files. This tutorial applies the Beaver text editor and the ls, pwd, and cat commands to set you on your way. Getting Started With Damn Small Linux Files

This tutorial applies the * and ? wildcards and the rm commands on your way to file mastery. Selecting And Deleting Damn Small Linux Files

This tutorial applies the mkdir, cd, and rm directory commands and the cp and mv file commands. In addition it introduces command options. Creating Directories, Copying, And Moving Damn Small Linux Files

This tutorial shows you how to go back and forth between the two users automatically created by Damn Small Linux and presents some differences between them. Introducing Damn Small Linux Users

This tutorial shows you create users and change their passwords. It reviews many aspects of the previous tutorial. Creating Damn Small Linux Users

This tutorial shows you how to copy text files back and forth from Linux to Windows. It is a complicated, lengthy procedure that can be well worth doing.

Copying Files Back And Forth From Linux To Windows

This tutorial shows you how to create a Backup USB pen drive, to copy Damn Small Linux files to the drive, and restore them later. While creating the drive is a lengthy procedure once it’s created copying and restoring files is quite easy.